Adjutant General's Corps Regimental Association

Adjutant General’s Corps Regimental Association: The Origins Story

By COL (Ret) Steve Shappell
VP, History, National Executive Council (NEC), AGCRA

What’s the difference between the Adjutant General’s Corps, the Adjutant General’s Corps Regiment, and the Adjutant General’s Corps Regimental Association?  While they are not interchangeable terms for the same entity, they are three separate but mutually supporting organizations.

The Adjutant General’s Corps is virtually as old as the Army itself.   On June 16, 1775, the Continental Congress resolved that there be an Adjutant General of the Continental Army.  The very next day they selected Horatio Gates, former British Major, as the first Adjutant General of the Continental Army with the rank of Brigadier General.  This appointment marked the birth of the Adjutant General’s Corps and established the Adjutant General branch as the oldest Combat Service Support branch of the Army.

Yet, it would not be until more than 200 years later that the Adjutant General’s Corps Regiment came into existence.

In 1981 the US Army introduced the Regimental System into its manning construct.  Initially limited to Combat Arms, the purpose of the Regimental System was to affiliate Soldiers with a regiment throughout their careers, in order to foster a sense of belonging and unit identity. In addition, the system sought to perpetuate the history, lineage, and honors of the regiments.  With multiple battalions in a regiment, and the battalions stationed at various places around the world, in theory, a Soldier could rotate between the continental United States and overseas assignments without leaving the regiment.  Several years later, Combat Support and Combat Services Support branches were added to the Regimental System, with each branch or corps becoming a single regiment.

In December 1985, the Chief of Staff of the Army approved the Adjutant General’s Corps Regimental Implementation Plan.  An estimated 54,000 Active component Soldiers were integrated into the Regiment, in addition to over 53,000 Army Reserve and Army National Guard Soldiers.  The actual activation of the Regiment took place on June 17, 1987, at Fort Benjamin Harrison, Indiana.   Two training battalions and eight reception battalions were redesignated and activated in the Regiment on the same day.  The Army designated Fort Benjamin Harrison, as the regimental home.  The Institute of Heraldry designed the Adjutant General’s Corps Regimental Crest and Colors, as well as the colors and crest for the redesignated battalions.

It was unfunded requirements associated with the regimental activation and unit redesignations that initially drove the need for the creation of the Adjutant General’s Corps Regimental Association.  The regimental activation required the regimental crests for distribution to the Soldiers of the Regiment, as well as the funding of activation events at the Adjutant General School and the installations on which the redesignated units resided.  These expenses were costs that had not been projected beforehand and thus were not in the School’s budget.

For this reason, the Adjutant General School leadership established the Adjutant General’s Corp Regimental Association as a non-profit organization whose primary purpose was to support the aims and objectives of the Adjutant General’s Corps Regiment.  The Association’s intent was to fund regimental projects through the sale of Adjutant General’s Corps memorabilia.

There were 199 founding members of the Adjutant General’s Corps Regimental Association, including Major Generals Verne L. Bowers, J. C. Pennington, Kenneth G. Wickham, and William G. O’Lesky; and Brigadier Generals Ronald E. Brooks, R. Lex Dilworth, James A. Norell, Mildred E. Hedberg, and Jack T. Pink.  Also present as founding members were several officers who would later go on to be General Officers of the Adjutant General’s Corps, including Captain Reuben D. Jones, Lieutenant Colonel Neil N. Snyder III, Colonel Frederick E. Vollrath,  and Colonel Arthur T. Dean.

As initially envisioned, the Adjutant General’s Corps Regimental Association was a worldwide organization based at Fort Benjamin Harrison.   Much of the early activity of the Association was thus focused on Fort Benjamin Harrison.   The first Chapter of the Adjutant General’s Corps Regimental Association, the Gold Vault Chapter – based at Fort Knox, Kentucky, was activated on December 5, 1988, and has been in continuous operation since that time.   One month later, the January 1989 edition of “1775,” The Journal of the Adjutant General’s Corps Regimental Association, announced the commencement of a worldwide Chapter program.  The next Chapter activated was the Iron Mike Chapter at Fort Bragg, activated on June 24, 1989.

Since the commencement of the worldwide Chapter program, the Adjutant General’s Corps Regimental Association has established over 55 Chapters worldwide.  Some of these, like the Morning Calm Chapter in the Republic of Korea, activated on November 9, 1989, remain in operation today.  As Chapters are located in places where the Army has Soldiers, some of these Chapters have ceased to operate as the Army has closed bases in the United States and around the world – permanently closed Chapters include the Greater Atlanta Chapter at Fort McPherson, Georgia (activated July 11, 1992); the Horatio Gates Chapter at Fort Benjamin Harrison (activated November 17, 1989, and inactivated Jun 23, 2003); and the Gateway Chapter at St. Louis, Missouri (activated October 28, 1998, and inactivated November 17, 2008).  Today, the Adjutant General’s Corps Regimental Association includes, in addition to installation-based Chapters, two Virtual Chapters (Army Special Operations Forces (ARSOF Chapter) and the Military Entrance Processing Command (Freedom’s Front Door Chapter)).  Additionally, in recent years Army National Guard focused Chapters have been activated, including the Volunteer Chapter (Tennessee National Guard) on August 12, 2015, and the S.H.I.E.L.D Chapter (Oregon National Guard) on December 9, 2017.

Due to the relocation of the Adjutant General School from Fort Benjamin Harrison in 1995, on July 14th of that year, the Adjutant General’s Corps Regimental Association officially moved its operating location to the new site of the School at Fort Jackson, South Carolina.

The position of the Commandant of the Adjutant General School, as the Chief of the Adjutant General’s Corps, traditionally carried with it the subsequent election as President of the Adjutant General’s Corps Regimental Association.   Additionally, members of the National Executive Council were traditionally drawn from the schoolhouse staff.  Through this connection, the Adjutant General’s Corps Regimental Association, while a private association, operated the Regimental Sutler Store on the premises of the Adjutant General School – first at Fort Benjamin Harrison and later at Fort Jackson. It was the proceeds from this store that, primarily, enabled the Regimental Association to fund activities in support of the Adjutant General School and the Adjutant General’s Corps Regiment.

Over the years, activities funded by the Adjutant General’s Corps Regimental Association have included an annual Scholarship Program, speaker honorarium, and ball sponsorships.

The Adjutant General’s Corps Regimental Association is, and has always been, a private organization in support of the Adjutant General’s Corps Regiment and the Adjutant General School.  As such, the Association has always had to be mindful of the Army regulations concerning the operations of private organizations on Army installations [1].  In 2016, it became apparent to the National Executive Council that operations of the Adjutant General’s Corps Regimental Association, headquarters on Fort Jackson and remaining in compliance with Army regulations, were no longer conducive to Association operations.  Thus, the Association moved all of its operations off post (including the Sutler Store) and determined that the Association leadership would no longer be automatically drawn from the Adjutant General School.

Colonel Neil McIntyre, Commandant of the Adjutant General School, resigned as Association President, and Colonel (Retired) Rob Manning, a former Commandant of the Adjutant General School and former President of the Association, was once again elected by the National Executive Committee to serve as Association President.  Moreover, this move off of the Army installation enabled the National Executive Council to expand its aperture for board members who are now drawn from around the world.

For historical purposes, the Adjutant General’s Corps Regimental Association has retained the term “Regimental” in its title as the Association was founded in 1987.  However, the re-publication of AR 870-21, The U.S. Army Regimental System, on 13 April 2017, officially dropped the term “Regiment” for the Adjutant General’s Corps.  The Adjutant General’s Corps is now listed as a separate “Corps” within the regulation.

Earlier this year – mindful that the flag traditionally associated with the Adjutant General’s Corps Regimental Association is in fact the flag designed by the Institute of Heraldry for the Adjutant General’s Corps Regiment – Colonel (Retired) Manning authorized a flag design contest to develop a visual representation to show that the Association is an organization distinct from the Adjutant General School and the Adjutant General’s Corps Regiment (now officially called the Adjutant General’s Corps).

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[1] Primarily Army Regulation 210-1, Private Organizations on Department of the Army Installations

TAG Sends: Promotions Update during the Brownout/Cutover (BOCO)

Teammates,

IPPS-A Release 3 Go-Live date is 20 December 2022 with a phased approach to user access.  On 20 December, HR professionals, including all subcategories, will have access to IPPS-A.  All other users will have access in January 2023, date to be published.

Continue to complete required training and complete priorities of work in preparation for Go-Live on 20 December.

Promotions Update during BOCO

The Brownout/Cutover (BOCO) period and implementation of IPPS-A impacted Soldier promotions (Officer, Warrant Officer, and Enlisted) during the months of November through January. Those who were promoted during this period can expect that pay and date of rank will be applied retroactively.  Commanders can authorize promotion ceremonies if all requirements are met (see below).

Enlisted Promotions Impacted During IPPS-A Transition

During BOCO, the Enlisted Promotion Branch will post sequence reports, by name reports, and cutoff scores in accordance with current policy on the HRC website.  The December list was posted, and January list is anticipated to post on time.  Commands are authorized to hold promotion ceremonies for Enlisted Soldiers selected for promotion in December and January.  Soldiers must not have any active Suspension of Favorable Personnel Action (Flags) – MILPER message 22-436.

Semi-Centralized and Centralized Promotion Information (SGT-SGM):

  • December 2022: All promotions and pay transactions will be late, but retroactive to 1 December 2022.

  • January 2023:  Eligibility criteria was established as of 9 November 2022 (normally 26 November 2022).  Promotion transactions will be late, but retroactive to 1 January 2023.

  • February 2023: Eligibility criteria will be established as of 3 January 2023 (normally 26 December 2022). Timely transactions and pay are expected.

Decentralized Promotion Information (PV2, PFC, SPC):

  • November 2022:  Pay and promotion will be delayed, but retroactive to the date the Soldier would have been promoted starting 10 November.

  • December 2022:  All promotions and pay transactions will be late, but retroactive to December 2022 respective DOR.

  • January 2023: Timely transactions and pay are expected.

December Enlisted Promotion Lists:

The Enlisted Promotions Branch sent an email to all Soldiers affected by the promotion delay on 30 November and 1 December reiterating the December delays due to BOCO as scripted below:

“You are receiving this message to inform you that your December promotion order is delayed. All orders for Soldiers eligible for promotion will be processed within the Integrated Personnel and Pay System – Army (IPPS-A) once the system is deployed.  All back pay and allowances will be paid retroactive to the effective date of your promotion order.  This delay is due to the IPPS-A brownout, initiated 10 November 2022.  Promotion orders are delayed to ensure the proper permanent date of rank is captured in the authoritative system, IPPS-A.

Soldiers are encouraged to continue to follow HRC MILPER messages for updated information at: https://www.hrc.army.mil/milper.

If you require assistance, please contact your servicing S-1 Office.

Thank you for your service to the nation.”

Reference MILPER Messages:

  • MILPER 22-436: Enlisted Promotions SGT through SGM during Brownout/Cutover for Implementation of IPPS-A

  • MILPER 22-402: November 2022 Unit Promotion Boards (SGT and SSG)

  • MILPER 22-453: Decentralized Enlisted Promotions PV2 through SPC during Brownout/Cutover for Implementation of the Integrated Personnel and Pay System – Army (IPPS-A)

Officers Promotions Impacted During IPPS-A Transition

During BOCO, Commanders may grant permission for Officers to conduct promotion ceremonies, if all promotion eligibility criteria are met per regulatory guidance.  Officers must not have any active Suspension of Favorable Personnel Action (Flags) – MILPER message 22-446.

HRC will continue to publish a monthly MILPER message with approved sequence numbers brownout/cut over period.  Officers with an effective date of promotion from 8 November 2022 and beyond will not receive promotion orders until after IPPS-A Go-Live.  Orders will be generated in IPPS-A within 30 days after Go-Live. Date of Rank (DOR) will be backdated to the effective date of promotion and back pay due will be retroactive.

Officer December Promotion Information:

  • MILPER 22-454: AGR Officer Promotion Sequence Numbers for December 2022

  • MILPER 22-455: AC Officer Sequence Numbers for December 2022

Officers December Promotions Lists:

https://www.milsuite.mil/book/community/spaces/apf/s1net/promotionsofficers/officerpromotionorders

Officer Promotions sent an email to all affected Officers with November Promotion dates on 10 November.  Additionally, DFAS sent messages to affected Officers with December Promotion dates on 29 November 2022, via “Smartdoc” reiterating the promotion delays due to BOCO as scripted below.  The DFAS call centers are armed with information to assist Soldiers with questions specific to pay delays during BOCO.

“You are receiving this message to inform you that your November/December promotion order is delayed.  All orders for officers eligible for promotion will be processed within the Integrated Personnel and Pay System – Army (IPPS-A) once the system is deployed.  All back pay and allowances will be paid retroactive to the effective date of your promotion order.  This delay is due to the IPPS-A brownout, initiated 10 November 2022.  Promotion orders are delayed to ensure the proper permanent date of rank is captured in the authoritative system, IPPS-A.

Officers are encouraged to continue to follow HRC MILPER messages for updated information at: https://www.hrc.army.mil/milper

If you require assistance, please contact your servicing S-1 Office.

Thank you for your service to the nation.

Please do not respond to this SmartDoc message, as requests will go to an unmonitored email box.”

Reference MILPER Messages:

  • MILPER 22-446: Officer Promotion Ceremonies during Brownout and Cutover for Implementation of IPPS-A

  • MILPER 22-437: Officer Promotions during Brownout and Cutover for Implementation of IPPS-A

 Suspension of Favorable Personnel Actions (FLAGS) for all Soldiers

Units will manually track and log all flagging actions placed or removed during BOCO.  On the first five (5) days after R3 Go-Live units will input flagging actions in IPPS-A to avoid erroneous promotions.

For HQDA initiated Flags, the Promotion Special Action Branch at HRC will manually log and track Flag code F flags, Delay of Promotion or removal from selection list, and the affected officer will receive a notification to their army.mil/mail.mil email with a manual DA Form 268.  The Promotions Special Action Branch will input HQDA F in IPPS-A within seven (7) days after go-live.

Consolidated list of Reference Brownout/Cutover Promotion MILPER Messages:

  • MILPER 22-446: Officer Promotion Ceremonies during Brownout and Cutover for Implementation of IPPS-A

  • MILPER 22-437: Officer Promotions during Brownout and Cutover for Implementation of IPPS-A

  • MILPER 22-412: AC Officer Promotion Sequence Numbers for November

  • MILPER 22-402: November 2022 Unit Promotion Boards (SGT and SSG)

  • MILPER 22-436: Enlisted Promotions SGT through SGM during Brownout/Cutover for Implementation of IPPS-A

  • MILPER 22-453: Decentralized Enlisted Promotions PV2 through SPC during Brownout/Cutover for Implementation of the Integrated Personnel and Pay System – Army (IPPS-A)

My POCs for promotions are:

Team Boxes:

Thank you for your continued support and hard work making IPPS-A happen and modernizing the AG Corps to meet the demands of Army 2030.

Shields Up!  Defend and Serve!

TAG63

BG Gregory S. Johnson
The Adjutant General of the Army/
CG, Physical Disability Agency/
Executive Director, MPSA
Office: 502-613-8001
DSN: 312-983-8001
Cell: 502-378-1973

Where in the World are the Monje’s (IV)

One of our favorite AGCRA globetrotting couples is at it again carrying our Association logo to new and unique locations. But where are COL (Ret) Nick and LTC (Ret) Dianne Monje this time?  They are again a lot closer than you would think.  So where in the world are they now?  Scroll down…

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Monje’s brought the AGCRA logo all the way to the top of Pike’s Peak, 14,115 feet above sea level, via the Cog Railway.  What fantastic views!

The AGCRA Logo in is the rain at Mesa Verde, Colorado.  Remember, “If it’s not rainin’, it’s not trainin’!” As well, “If it’s not snowin’; we’re not goin’!” Nothing stops AG Corps Soldiers (Retirees included).

After riding the Durango & Silverton Narrow Gage Railroad, the AGCRA logo stopped in at the Durango Train Station Museum and hoped aboard The Harper’s Private Car – The Silverton.  Al Harper was owner of the Durango & Silverton Narrow Gauge Railroad, Durango, CO.

Located in the “Freedom Is Not Free” section of the Durango Museum, would you believe Dianne Monje found a couple of 4th ID AG Corps Soldier mannequins dressed in Army green uniforms with AG Corps shields and ribbons.

Dianne Monje stands next to MAJ Kelly, AG Corps Officer – Ready for Inspection?

Dianne stands with SGT Hallberts, a 4th ID AG Corps NCO – Ready to Roll; Rifle at the Ready; Movin’ to the Sound of Guns; Ready to Fight… now that’s Readiness, Hoo-Ah!