Adjutant General's Corps Regimental Association

1775 – Fall 2020

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Greetings from the Home of the AG Corps, Fort Jackson, South Carolina.  Wow!  Most of us probably never thought that we would experience the many challenges brought on by COVID-19, but the Army and the AG Corps continue to meet these tremendous challenges head-on. 

It is with great pleasure that we bring you the latest issue of 1775 which features many articles of how AG Corps Soldiers have adapted and ultimately persevered through the countless technical and administrative challenges encountered with telework, masks, and social distancing.  Like all Army operations, there are lessons to be learned and SOPs to rewrite.

We hope you enjoy this edition of 1775 and solicit your comments and feedback at Magazine@agcra.com.

Special thanks to MAJ James Gerling and AGCCC Class 002-20 for the front cover of this edition.

Defend and Serve!

Paul R. Dwigans
Lieutenant Colonel (Retired), U.S. Army
AGCRA VP, Publications
Editor, 1775
Magazine@agcra.com

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Music for Holistic Health and Fitness

On October 1st of 2020, the U.S. Army published Field Manual (FM) 7-22 Holistic Health and Fitness. It represents a complete picture of how to train and ensure the health of Soldiers, not just physically, but emotionally, socially, psychologically, and spiritually. This doctrinal publication takes its cues from a wide breadth of knowledge from the medical and performance communities. For the first time since World War II, music is recognized as a contributor to Soldier health.

In July of 1945, the War Department published Technical Bulletin (TB) Medical 187- Music in Recondition in Armed Service Forces Convalescent and General Hospitals. This document described how nurses and doctors were to use music during the recovery process, both from physical and mental wounds of war. The techniques described formed the basis of modern music therapy, which is now a board-certified profession.

The first mention of music in FM 7-22 deals with sleep from paragraph 11-18- “Some individuals believe that they sleep better with music or a television on, that they can sleep anywhere, and the ambient noise does not bother them. Research clearly shows this is not the case.” Continued in paragraph 11-19- “Pre-sleep routines that promote winding down- such as listening to soothing music, reading, or taking a warm shower or bath- 30-60 minutes prior to bedtime tend to facilitate the transition to sleep.” There have been several studies done on the relationship between music listening and sleep. This meta-analysis showed a moderate effect for listening to music and subjective quality of sleep for insomnia patients. The challenge with much of the research in this area, is that music listening is individualistic. So called “soothing music” can refer to huge variety of different styles. This study showed a temporary memory boost for a specific task when listening to music during sleep. There isn’t conclusive evidence that music listening before or during sleep improves quality. However, if it is part of a routine already established, it is likely to be helpful. Soldiers can reach out to their peers in Army Bands on recommendations for finding music that is both enjoyable and calming for pre-sleep routines.

Music can be a companion to both pre-conditioning and recovery from physical activity. If you have ever been to a professional football game, you will often see the players wearing headphones during their on-field warmups. This is a personally selected mix that provides them a motivational boost. It is their time for individual focus on the task that lies ahead. As they get closer to game-time, the headphones are gone, and the team comes together through shared chants/movements. This builds social bonding as the team begins the game. In Lisa Gilman’s book My Music My War, Soldiers recount their use of music to get pumped-up while getting their gear ready, and then having a shared song played on a makeshift stereo inside their vehicles right before going outside the wire. During recovery, paragraph 12-49 of FM 7-22 states- “A quiet, comfortable, and dimly lit environment with calming music can assist with mental imagery, deep breathing practice, muscle relaxation, and mindfulness practice.” This spa-like atmosphere is certainly achievable in garrison, but in combat environments is unlikely to be possible. Often this type of recovery is only available after long-term stress and/or trauma, delivered by a certified practitioner. These types of recovery practices will be more effective when delivered closer to the stressful event.

The variety of ways music is processed in the brain.

Personal Development is an important part of a holistic health approach. If one’s professional life is all-consuming, it can cause undue stress and long-term complications. Engaging with music through practice, performance, and composing has several benefits for cognitive functioning and social bonding. There are tremendous resources on the internet for learning and engaging with music, however it can be overwhelming. Having a mentor will help improve the experience as the key benefit lies in the human to human interaction. Synchronization through rhythm and movement creates neurochemical boosts in the brain which make us feel closer to those with whom we play music. Army Bands can provide opportunities for all Soldiers to engage with music from jam sessions, drum circles, talent showcases, and performances. Such work is already happening with warrior care services (supported by the National Endowment for the Arts Creative Forces Military Health Initiative), but should be expanded to all those who want to participate.

The power of the mind is incredibly important to total well-being. The current professional consensus does not fully support FM 7-22 when speaking of mind-body practices in paragraph 13-29- “Some mind-body practices do not require referral for clinical or professional intervention. These practices can include art therapies such as music, visual arts, and dance.” There is strict delineation between clinical art-based therapies and the general use of the arts for holistic health. The everyday stress and rigors of being a Soldier do not require a clinical intervention, but rather mentorship from experts and support from colleagues. If a trauma-inducing event occurs and is diagnosed by a medical professional, then a clinical intervention is needed, which can be delivered by board-certified creative arts therapists. Music as medicine can be self-administered or delivered by a facilitator, whereas a music therapist can provide specific interventions aimed at improving a diagnosed condition. The American Music Therapy Association provides as excellent overview of working with military populations.

The Army has come full circle from 1945 in its application of music for health outcomes. 3,000+ musicians stand at the ready to facilitate and advise for the use of music to improve Soldier readiness. There is also an ever-expanding network of music therapists working as Department of the Army Civilians and contractors. Army Bands in collaboration with music therapists are already improving the health of the force and will continue to reach more Soldiers and Families through greater awareness of music’s health benefits.

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Richard Saddler: Soldier, Spouse, Father, Musician

In April of 2020, the Saddler family and the United States Army lost a remarkable man. Richard Nathaniel Saddler passed away at the age of 89, previously serving his country for over 41 years. He was born in Irondale, Alabama, and later moved to Detroit, Michigan where he studied trumpet at Wayne State University. In July of 1952, he was drafted into the Army and upon completion of basic training was assigned to the 298th Army Band of Berlin, Germany. During his time there he met his life-long spouse Hannelore. It was turbulent times in Germany as half the country was oppressed under communist control. Richard would return to Germany multiple times in his career forging remarkable connections with the communities surrounding the Army bases there.

Mr. Saddler continued his musical education throughout his 15 years as an enlisted Soldier, studying with luminary brass players Mel Broiles (New York Metropolitan Opera, West Point Band) and John Coffey (Boston Symphony Orchestra). During this time, he served in Bands stationed at: Fort Sam Houston, Texas, Fort Devens, Massachusetts, Stuttgart, Germany, and Fort Ord, California.

Specialist Saddler plays the trumpet for a Soldier dance in Germany

 

President Nixon praises CW2 Saddler for an excellent band performance while commanding the 282nd Army Band, For Jackson, SC.

In 1967, Richard Saddler was appointed as a Warrant Officer and assigned to the 282nd Army Band, Fort Jackson, South Carolina. Soon after arriving, he led the band in support of the Vice President and later, President Nixon. Even after being an Army Band Soldier for many years, everything changes when you are the one holding the baton. Richard was keen reader of people, his outgoing nature surely served him well when interacting with high-ranking officials and the public at large.

 

 

 

The summer of 1969, was turbulent time for the United States, and Mr. Saddler found himself in charge of the 1st Cavalry Division Band providing music for troops in Vietnam. In November 1969, the band was giving one of its firebase concerts which were designed to give variety and entertainment to the otherwise repetitive days of jungle outposts. Upon being fired on, from the nearby jungle, the band had to drop their instruments and take up their M-16s. Following the fire fight, they returned to continue their concert. The timing of this event lines up with Mr. Saddler’s command, but this story cannot be corroborated. However, his son (Colonel (R) Richard Saddler), relayed stories of multiple times his father had to hit the dirt/mud during firefights. It was common practice during the Vietnam War for Army Musicians to serve in perimeter security roles along with their primary mission of playing music.

Mr. Saddler connects with local Vietnamese during an outreach concert.

 

The newspaper of Aberdeen Proving Ground reported on Chief Saddler’s assumption of command of the 324th Army Band in 1970. The writer highlights the band capturing a North Vietnamese lieutenant after getting close to their camp to hear the band’s music. Once again, the band under Saddler’s leadership was a direct contributor to the fight as Soldiers and musicians. Richard knew that music is a binding force that can lift spirits and bring people together. He made sure to bring music to as many troops as possible and along the way interacting with a diverse range of communities.

From Vietnam to the Cold War front in Berlin, Germany, Chief Saddler and his troops made their mark on history. Chief Warrant Officer 5 (R) Dave Ratliff remembers his time serving under Saddler: “…we raised the United States flag at the U.S. Ambassador’s residence in East Berlin, and provided music for all the Americans stationed on that side of the wall…..He gave the crowd what they wanted to hear and then he took them on a journey.  The stage band, rock combo, and concert band entertained the crowd to thunderous ovations and encores.  His interaction with the audience is the primary lesson I learned.” Saddler was a mentor to many and truly understood what it meant to take care of Soldiers and their Families.

Connecting with a student audience in Germany

The 298th Army Band (Berlin Brigade) was a unit famous for its ability to connect the U.S. Military to the people of Germany, when their country was divided by communism. The town of Einhausen was particularly welcoming and through the band’s performances a long-term trust was built. Often alumni from the band would go back to Einhausen to perform and share memories with the community.

After his time in Germany, Mr. Saddler served the rest of his career with the 392nd Army Band at Fort Lee, Virginia and the 74th Army Band, Fort Benjamin Harrison, Indiana. There he continued being an inspiring mentor and leader, helping Soldiers not only join the Army Band but shepherd them through their career. He retired from the Army in 1993, as a Master Warrant Officer 4, the highest warrant officer rank at the time.

COL (R) Saddler remembers his father spending many nights writing and arranging music. Often with his German-style concertina (reed-bellows instrument) by his side. Dick Saddler was a man who learned music from some of the best teachers and used his love of music in service of others through the Army. His kind spirit served him well in taking care of those under his command. The combination of music and Army training allowed him to lead troops in combat environments and high-pressure ceremonies for dignitaries. He is remembered fondly by the hundreds of Soldier-Musicians he served with and led. Mr. Saddler has left an incredible legacy to the United States Army, The Adjutant General’s Corps, and the Army Band community.

Richard N. Saddler is survived by his loving wife, Hannelore Lilli Saddler; children, Susan Starks, Colonel (R) Richard Saddler, and Yvonne Glover; grandchildren, Dr. Sabina Holland, Alisha Saddler, Lindsey Saddler, Derrick Glover, Eric Glover, and Donald Glover; sister, Jeanne Saddler; and brother, Daryl Saddler.

 

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