Adjutant General's Corps Regimental Association

AGCRA Chapter Lineage

The Chapter lineage provided below is compiled by the AGCRA Historian and Association files reviewed since AGCRA’s founding in 1987.  This Chapter linage is a living document and will continue to be updated.  Point of contact is the AGCRA historian at Historian@agcra.com.

Aloha (Hawaii)

16 Nov 1991 – Chapter activated.

16 Jun 2008 – AGCRA President (COL Mustion) sent Senior HR Officer (COL Swain) an inactive letter.

17 Nov 2008 – AGCRA President (COL Manning) wrote to Senior HR Officer (COL Swain) asking for support to reinvigorate the Chapter; Chapter was subsequently reactivated.

Alamo (Fort Sam Houston)

7 Jun 2010 – Chapter activated.

Arctic Adjutants (Alaska)

14 May 1993 – Chapter activated.

14 Oct 1999 – Requested to amend by-laws to reflect two subcommittees, based on geographical dispersion (North – Forts Wainwright and Greely; South – Fort Richardson) under one Chapter President.

15 Oct 1999 – AGCRA NEC approved request for two subcommittees.

16 Jun 2008 – AGCRA President (COL Mustion) sent Senior HR Officer (LTC Vannatter) an inactive letter.

17 Nov 2008 – AGCRA President (COL Manning) wrote to Senior HR Officer (LTC Vannatter) asking for support to reinvigorate the Chapter.

11 Feb 2009 – Chapter inactivated by AGCRA President (COL Manning).

8 Nov 2010 – Chapter reactivated by AGCRA President (COL Manning).

28 Jan 2019 – Chapter is currently in an inactive status.

ARSOF (Virtual) – based at Fort Bragg

27 Aug 2012 – Chapter activated.

Bavaria (Germany)

10 Mar 2004 – Chapter dissolved by AGCRA President (COL Bartholomew).

Unknown Date – Chapter reactivated.

16 Jun 2008 – Chapter deactivated by AGCRA President (COL Mustion).

Bison (Fort Riley)

21 Sep 1990 – Chapter activated.

16 Jun 2008 – AGCRA President (COL Mustion) sent Seniorr HR Officer (LTC Golya) an inactive letter.

Unknown Date – Chapter reactivated.

Buffalo Bill (Wyoming)

6 Apr 1991 – Chapter activated.

16 Jun 2008 – Chapter deactivated by AGCRA President (COL Mustion).

Carolina Chapter (Fort Jackson)

14 Feb 1991 – Chapter activated.

Chesapeake Bay Chapter (Fort Meade)

16 Jun 2008 – AGCRA President (COL Mustion) sent Senior HR Officer (Mr. Ham) an inactive letter.

17 Nov 2008 – AGCRA President (COL Manning) wrote to Senior HR Officer (Mr. Ham) asking for support to reinvigorate the Chapter.

28 Jan 2019 – Chapter is currently in an inactive status.

Eisenhower (SHAPE Belgium)

16 Apr 1991 – Chapter activated.

10 Mar 2004 – AGCRA President (COL Bartholomew) sent Chapter viability letter to Senior HR Officer (COL Poet).

Unknown Date – Chapter was deactivated.

Follow Me (Fort Benning)

27 Aug 2013 – Chapter President (LTC Welch) requested name change from Follow Me to Fort Benning,

26 Sep 1023 – AGCRA President (COL Garlick) approved name change to Fort Benning,

Freedom’s Front Door (USMEPCOM Virtual)

24 Sep 2010 – Chapter activated.

Gateway Chapter (St. Louis)

14 Aug 1998 – Chapter submitted activation petition signed by CPT Towne, Chapter President.

28 Oct 1998 – Activated as 29th AGCRA Chapter by AGCRA President (COL Hardesty).

16 Jun 2008 – AGCRA President (COL Mustion) sent Senior HR Officer (COL Goode) an inactive letter.

30 Jul 2008 – COL Goode requests formal deactivation of Chapter.

17 Nov 2008 – Chapter deactivated by AGCRA President (COL Manning).

Gator (Fort Polk)

9 Nov 1994 – Chapter submitted activation petition signed by LTC Reehm, Chapter President.

1 Mar 1995 – Chapter activated.

16 Jun 2008 – AGCRA President (COL Mustion) sent Senior HR Officer (MAJ Manus) an inactive letter.

Unknown Date – Chapter reactivates.

Golden State (California ARNG)

12 May 2009 – Chapter submitted activation petition signed by LTC MacDonald, Chapter President.

7 Jul 2009 – Chapter activated.

Gold Vault (Fort Knox)

5 Dec 1988 – Chapter activated

10 Mar 2004 – AGCRA President (COL Bartholomew) sent Chapter viability letter to Senior HR Officer (LTC Rado).

28 Jan 2019 – Chapter is considered a large hub Chapter based on activity and support.

Greater Atlanta (Fort McPherson)

11 Jul 1992 – Chapter activated.

16 Jun 2008 – AGCRA President (COL Mustion) sent Senior HR Officer (COL Barnes) an inactive letter.

6 Jul 2008 – Chapter (LTC Downer) requested good standing memo in order to register on Fort McPherson.

21 Jul 2008 – AGCRA President (COL Manning) sent memo to Chapter attesting its good standing.

Unknown Date – Chapter deactivated with closing of Fort McPherson and movement of FORSCOM Headquarters to Fort Bragg.

Horatio Gates (Fort Ben Harrison)

17 Nov 1989 – Chapter activated.

9 Mar 1995 – Chapter proposed deactivation concurrent with deactivation of AG School Battalion in June 1995, the move of the Soldier Support Center to Fort Jackson, and renaming the Chapter the Gates-Carolina Chapter at Fort Jackson.  The units remaining on Fort Ben Harrison after the 1991 BRAC were:  The Defense Finance and Accounting Service (DFAS), several USAR and Indiana National Guard units, and the Indianapolis Military Entrance Processing Station (MEPS); hence the Horatio Gates Chapter remained active and a new Carolina Chapter was activated at Fort Jackson.

3 Mar 2003 – AGCRA President (COL Bartholomew) sent Chapter viability letter to Chapter.

27 Jun 2003 – Chapter (COL Jones) declares itself a non-viable Chapter.

Hudson Valley (West Point)

19 Feb 1995 – Chapter submitted activation petition signed by COL Wyatt.

27 Apr 1995 – Chapter activated.

10 Mar 2004 – AGCRA President (COL Bartholomew) sent Chapter viability letter to Senior HR Officer (LTC Dagnes).

16 Jun 2008 – AGCRA President (COL Mustion) sent Senior HR Officer (COL Bruno) an inactive letter.

17 Nov 2008 – AGCRA President (COL Manning) wrote to Senior HR Officer (COL Bruno) asking for support to reinvigorate the Chapter.

28 Jan 2019 – Chapter is currently in an inactive status.

Iron Mike (Fort Bragg)

24 June 1989 – Chapter activated.

28 Jan 2019 – Chapter is considered a large hub Chapter based on activity and support.

Iron Soldier (Fort Bliss) – see Rio Grande and Sun City below.

Lion of St. Mark (Vicenza, Italy)

13 Apr 1992 – Chapter submitted activation petition signed by 2LT Magee.

30 Apr 1993 – Chapter activated.

10 Mar 2004 – AGCRA President (COL Bartholomew) sent Chapter viability letter to Senior HR Officer (LTC Waters).

16 Jun 2008 – AGCRA President (COL Mustion) sent Senior HR Officer (LTC Waters) an inactive letter.

17 Nov 2008 – AGCRA President (COL Manning) wrote to Senior HR Officer (LTC Perfetti) asking for support to reinvigorate chapter.

Lone Star (Fort Hood)

13 Jan 1993 – Chapter activated.

28 Jan 2019 – Chapter is considered a large hub Chapter based on activity and support.

Masters City (Fort Gordon)

15 May 2012 – Chapter submitted activation petition signed by SGM Royal.

26 Jun 2012 – Chapter activated.

Mediterranean (Naples, Italy / AFSOUTH)

26 Apr 2013 – Chapter activated.

Morning Calm (Korea)

9 Nov 1989 – Chapter activated.

Mountaineer (Fort Drum)

3 Nov 1992 – Chapter submitted activation petition signed by CPT Manta.

6 May 1994 – Chapter activated.

16 Jun 2008 – AGCRA President (COL Mustion) sent Senior HR Officer (LTC Masley) an inactive letter.

Mount Rainier (Fort Lewis)

21 Nov 1991 – Chapter activated.

16 Jun 2008 – AGCRA President (COL Mustion) sent Senior HR Officer (COL Avery) an inactive letter.

Old Dominion (VA ARNG)

27 Jun 2012 – Chapter submitted activation petition signed by MAJ Martin.

4 Sep 2012 – Chapter activated.

Ozark (Fort Leonard Wood)

12 Mar 1992 – Chapter activated.

Patton’s Gateway (Kuwait)

7 Apr 2015 – Chapter activated.

28 Jan 2019 – Chapter is currently in an inactive status.

Pike’s Peak (Fort Carson)

17 Dec 2001 – Chapter activated.

10 Mar 2004 – AGCRA President (COL Bartholomew) sent Chapter viability letter to Senior HR Officer (LTC Devine).

16 Jun 2008 – AGCRA President (COL Mustion) sent Senior HR Officer (Ms. Foster) an inactive letter.

17 Nov 2008 – AGCRA President (COL Manning) wrote to Senior HR Officer (LTC Hauser) asking for support to reinvigorate chapter.

Pony Express (Fort Leavenworth)

28 May 1993 – Chapter activated.

10 Mar 2004 – AGCRA President (COL Bartholomew) sent Chapter viability letter to Senior HR Officer (LTC Adams).

16 June 2008 – Deactivated by AGCRA President (COL Mustion).

2018 – Chapter reactivates.

Potomac (NCR)

2 Jun 1990 – Chapter activated.

28 Jan 2019 – Chapter is considered a large hub Chapter based on activity and support.

Red River (Fort Sill)

19 Nov 1990 – Chapter activated.

17 Nov 2008 – AGCRA President (COL Manning) wrote to Senior HR Officer (LTC Staley) asking for support to reinvigorate the Chapter.

Rhein-Hessen (Bad Kreuznach, Germany)

26 May 1994 – Chapter submitted activation petition signed by LTC McKenney.

18 Jun 1994 – Chapter activated.

10 Mar 2004 – AGCRA President (COL Bartholomew) sent Chapter viability letter to Senior HR Officer (COL Finke).

16 June 2008 – Chapter deactivated by AGCRA President (COL Mustion)

Rhein-Neckar (Heidelberg, Germany)

19 Apr 1991 – Chapter activated.

10 Mar 2004 – AGCRA President (COL Bartholomew) sent Chapter viability letter to Senior HR Officer (COL Finke).

17 Nov 2008 – AGCRA President (COL Manning) wrote to Senior HR Officer (COL Ellis) asking for support to reinvigorate the Chapter.

Rio Grande (Fort Bliss)

8 Mar 2002 – Chapter submitted activation petition signed by LTC Miller.

15 Apr 2002 – Chapter activated.

16 Jun 2008 – AGCRA President (COL Mustion) sent Senior HR Officer (COL Bailey) an inactive letter.

17 Nov 2008 – AGCRA President (COL Manning) wrote to Senior HR Officer (COL Bailey) asking for support to reinvigorate the Chapter.

13 Apr 2012 – Chapter submitted activation petition and name change as Iron Soldier Chapter signed by MAJ Jacobson.

30 May 2012 – Chapter activated as Iron Soldier Chapter.

2018 – Chapter requests and is approved for name change to Sun City.

Rocket City (Redstone Arsenal)

19 Mar 2012 – Chapter activated.

Rock of the Marne (Fort Stewart)

14 Feb 1994 – Chapter submitted activation petition signed by LTC Rogers.

28 Apr 1994 – Chapter activated as First to Fight Chapter.

30 Apr 1999 – Chapter submitted name change to Rock of the Marne.

18 May 1999 – National Executive Council (NEC) approves name change.

3 Mar 2003 – AGCRA President (COL Bartholomew) sent Chapter viability letter placing Chapter on 6 months probation.

4 Sep 2003 – Chapter requested an extension of probation until 1 Feb 2004.

16 Jun 2008 – AGCRA President (COL Mustion) sent Senior HR Officer (LTC Aiton) an inactive letter.

17 Nov 2008 – AGCRA President (COL Manning) wrote to Senior HR Officer (LTC Aiton) asking for support to reinvigorate the Chapter.

Screaming Eagle (Fort Campbell)

21 Aug 1992 – Chapter activated.

10 Mar 2004 – AGCRA President (COL Bartholomew) sent Chapter viability letter to Senior HR Officer (LTC King) placing chapter on probation for 6 months.

16 Jun 2008 – AGCRA President (COL Mustion) sent Senior HR Officer (LTC Miller) an inactive letter.

Space Coast (DEOMI, Patrick AFB)

8 Dec 2014 – Chapter submitted activation petition signed by LTC Beckwith.

22 Jan 2015 – Chapter activated.

28 Jan 2019 – Chapter is currently inactive.

Spartan (Fort McCoy)

27 Oct 2011 – Chapter submitted activation petition signed by SFC Windom.

2 Dec 2011 – Chapter activated.

Sun City (Fort Bliss)– see Rio Grande and Sun City above.

2018 – Iron Soldier Chapter requests and is approved for name change to Sun City.

Thunder Mountain (Fort Huachuca)

6 Nov 1995 – Chapter submitted activation petition signed by COL Murphy.

19 Jan 1996 – Chapter activated.

10 Mar 2004 – AGCRA President (COL Bartholomew) sent Chapter viability letter to Senior HR Officer (LTC Ladra) placing Chapter on probation for 6 months.

Tidewater (Fort Monroe)

11 Apr 1990 – Chapter activated.

Tri-Cities (Fort Lee)

9 Aug 2012 – Chapter submitted activation petition signed by LTC Windisch.

6 Sep 2012 – Chapter activated.

Volunteer (TN ARNG)

7 Jul 2015 – Chapter submitted activation petition signed by MAJ Stackpole.

12 Aug 2015 – Chapter activated.

Windmill (Brunssum, Netherlands)

3 May 2002 – Chapter submitted activation petition signed by LTC Lindahl.

26 Aug 2002 – Chapter activated.

Unknown Date – Chapter deactivated.

 

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Army HRC Installs First Female CSM / Senior Enlisted Leader

CSM Lynice Thorpe-Noel assumed responsibility of the Army’s Human Resources Command (HRC) as its first female Senior Enlisted Advisor.

During a ceremony hosted by MG Jason T. Evans, HRC Commanding General, held on Fort Knox, 17 January 2019, CSM Wardell Jefferson officially relinquished his duties to CSM Lynice Thorpe-Noel.

“It is an honor to lead and continue the legacy of the 15 Command Sergeants Major before me who represented and cared so well for our Soldiers and Civilians,” CSM Thorpe-Noel said.  “My focus is on motivating, inspiring, and leading from the front while supporting my Commander to advance HRC’s priorities.  Through modernization, reform, talent management initiatives, and most importantly, taking care of Soldiers we will realize the future of Army readiness.”

CSM Thorpe-Noel, who spent the last few years as the HRC Enlisted Personnel Management Directorate Sergeant Major, now takes on the leading enlisted role for HRC.  The command conducts distribution, strategic talent management, and information technology for a full spectrum of human resources programs and services, Army wide.  Those programs and services enable the Army to deploy, fight and win our nation’s wars.

“The main focus from my foxhole is setting the right environment for ambitious strategic thinkers to optimize the Army’s lethality; getting the right Soldiers, with the right capabilities, in the right position at the right time.  What we do at HRC is critical to the overall mission of America’s Army,” she said.  “This may sound simple, but there is an art and science to getting human resources right and our team does just that on a daily basis.”  In terms of the direction she sees HRC and the Army going, CSM Thorpe-Noel said readiness is key.

“We are the execution arm of Army G-1.  Our collective efforts will result in the implementation of IPPS-A, providing more tools in our manager’s tool kit to support the Officer and Enlisted talent management market places,” she said.  “As talent managers we need to be ambitious in our strategic thinking.  Let’s envision a future for Army human resources which optimizes talent management and make adjustments now to realize success.  Preparation is essential to readiness.”

CSM Jefferson, who assumed responsibility of HRC in August of 2015, now heads to the Pentagon where he will serve as the Sergeant Major for the Deputy Chief of Staff of the Army, G-1.  Under his watch, HRC was instrumental in the formation and manning of Security Force Assistance Brigades.  He spearheaded the Enlisted Talent Management system which optimized readiness and leader development through force alignment and career management.  CSM Jefferson continues to work in unison with Army G-1 in the development, fielding and roll-out of the Integrated Personnel and Pay System-Army.

“One of the biggest initiatives that we accomplished as a team during my tour as the HRC CSM is improving the way we manage the Enlisted population.  Although Talent management (TM) doesn’t fall completely on the shoulders of HRC, we do play an important role in that,” CSM Jefferson said.

CSM Jefferson also said he feels his transition to G-1 will be seamless.  “Our missions go hand in hand,” he said.  “G-1 writes policy and HRC executes it.  This requires a considerable amount of communication, and day-to-day interaction between senior leaders.  We have improved and maintained that over the past 3 plus years.”

With CSM Jefferson’s tenure coming to a close and CSM Thorpe-Noel’s just beginning, she sees a bright future for the Soldiers in her care and for the next generation of Army leaders.  “Our nation’s strength stems from its diversity and that diversity should be reflected in the ranks of our Army.  That’s what the American people expect – Soldiers and leaders who look like themselves and their loved ones – and that’s what they will get from HRC,” CSM Thorpe-Noel said.  “In America’s Army, the only barriers that exist are the ones that Soldiers choose to see.  I think if you choose to ignore those barriers, you can realize endless possibilities.”

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The American Revolution – The Army AG at Work

Researched by:  COL (Ret) Gary L. Gresh, Writer and Historian

Colonel Timothy Pickering, the sixth AG of the Army.

Colonel Timothy Pickering was the Adjutant General for General George Washington during much of the Revolutionary War.  He was a very special man educated at Harvard and eventually would also serve as both Secretary of War and as Secretary of State for President George Washington in his administration.  Colonel Pickering also was responsible for the commissioning and forging of the “Great Chain” at West Point which was used to prevent the British Navy from using the Hudson River to link up with British naval Forces in Canada during the War.  The successful deployment and use of the Great Chain across the Hudson prevented the British Navy from ever massing its naval Forces against the city of New York.

While it is unknown just how many aides or assistants each Adjutant General may have had during the Revolutionary War, it is rather well documented that each senior officer in Washington’s Colonial Army had at least two personal aides or servants because of the many duties that had to be accomplished each day by and for the senior officers.  Tents had to be erected, meals had to be cooked, and clothes needed to be washed, laid out, and horses needed to be cared for everyday.  Each senior officer had little time to accomplish such tasks while serving in their very demanding positions for General Washington.  Therefore, they were allowed to use aides and many actually employed their own staff from their own family funds.

Colonel Pickering was known to have had at least one junior officer that he used as an aide during the war.  The author begs indulgence to speculate that this aide would have been a family man and would have written home often as many of the officers did at the time.  In a special letter home from Lieutenant Reynolds, Aide to Colonel Timothy Pickering, The Adjutant General, U.S. Army, West Point, who wrote the following letter to his wife in November 1779.  Note – Historical indulgences from various archives and sources, U.S. Library of Congress, and the Library of West Point.

November 30, 1779:  My Dearest Rebecca: My Wife and My Love, I miss you and the children daily and hope I can visit home soon.  Please know that my services here are much needed and I am certain our future depends on the success of this valiant mission.  Our sons and daughters must be made to understand the great sacrifices that are being made daily for this precious freedom we all seek.  I feel that I am witnessing the greatest events of the century and that what we are doing may in fact become very historic indeed!

Yesterday, November 29, 1779 was a very special day here at our Fortress at West Point.  General Washington had his key leaders to a conference meeting.  I have heard these famous names many times but never had the chance to have met them face-to-face before.  So many famous people have come to West Point, literally putting their lives on the line for freedom and independence for our cause.  General Von Steuben from Prussia, The Marquis de Lafayette of France, Lieutenant Colonel Alexander Hamilton, Aide-De-Camp, to General Washington, Engineers Colonel Kosciuszko and Captain Machin, and the Army’s current Adjutant Generals Colonel Pickering and Colonel Scammell were all in attendance with an even larger contingent of the Army and its leaders.

The day started with breakfast of dried beef and talk of the upcoming battles and the need to keep the British Forces split between New York and Canada.  As assistant to Colonel Pickering, I got to sit in on all meetings and see the leaders at work.  Colonel Pickering is so very calm, which I believe he has learned from General Washington.  As the present Adjutant General of the Army, Colonel Pickering is charged with all conscription of troops and spends most of his time talking with town leaders in an attempt to get more volunteers for the Army.  If I have learned anything from Colonel Pickering, it is the need for better troop accountability and reporting.  Many troops come and go at will, visiting home, and carrying letters back and forth.  It is difficult to know just how many troops we actually have, as there seems to be no formal reporting methods in place.  Most companies rely on their First Sergeants to know who is Enlisted and who is gone on leave or duty elsewhere.  But things become very complicated when we have battle losses and wounded taken to various field hospitals and clinics.  There is no system to account for such losses and Colonel Pickering is determined to establish a formal accountability system for the Army.  He has asked each Sergeant to submit a report each morning to his Commander so that we can account for all of the Soldiers.

General Washington has brought his staff here to oversee the specific timing and trials of bringing in the great chain across the Hudson, put in place by Colonel Pickering and his Soldiers over the past two years.  “Washington’s Watch Chain”, as the newspapers in New York, have dubbed it, is the great chain across the Hudson, which has now been in place almost two years and seems to be doing its intended purpose of keeping the British Navy in New York.  Our Gun Batteries overlook the chain and river and are ready to attack any British ship trying to navigate the Hudson north to Canada.  Colonel Pickering continues to maintain contact with the Sterling Foundry Works to replace weak links in the chain, or to provide extra links as needed.  The chain came out of the river yesterday and it was quite an operation to behold.  General Washington took his entire staff down to River Bank to the chain emplacement and oversaw the removal of the chain personally.

It was quite a spectacle to see as the entire staff, General Washington on his great horse, Nelson, overseeing all the Soldiers and officers conducting the boat operation to retrieve the chain before the river would freeze over.  Two men were badly hurt when a boat got caught between the oxen lines and pinched the men in between the lines.  I thought at first that they had legs amputated, but it turned out they just got severely cut and bruised badly.  Ice is the great enemy of the chain as the links will split and separate if the river freezes with the chain still in the water.  Boats were used to maneuver the barges and raffs toward shore where the oxen could pull the great chain up on the bank of the river.  It took the entire afternoon and evening by torchlight to get the chain onto the shore and it was none too soon as the river had ice floating in it as we finished up last night.

Colonel Alexander Scammel, the seventh AG of the Army.

I will never forget seeing General Washington riding back and forth on that great horse talking to every Soldier, talking with the head of his honor guard and with his guests.  General Washington is always at his best when riding.  He becomes more animated and actually talks to almost everyone.  His staff meetings are much different where he mostly listens to others.  General Von Steuben and The Marquis de Lafayette both commented to Colonel Pickering that General Washington is the right man at the right time for the American Army, as he is as noble as any aristocrat on horseback yet is truly an American Patriot in demeanor and leadership.  Colonel Scammell is to take over as the Adjutant General next week from Colonel Pickering.  I wanted to go with Colonel Pickering as he is to return to his regiment, but I have been told I will remain on here at West Point with Colonel Scammel to make his transition a bit easier.

I miss home and particularly the warmth of our bed at night.  It seems to be cold here all the time with nowhere to get warm.  I finally found a pair of gloves that have helped immensely.  My fingers get particularly cold since I must remove gloves to write and I write a lot every day transposing figures for Colonel Pickering.  If you can find a way to send me gloves or knit cap, I would be much thankful.

We have had several skirmishes on the north side of the encampment with British Soldiers who are evidently trying to determine the best avenues of approach to the West Point Fort.  It is rumored that the Army will move to New Jersey soon as the weather at West Point is getting too brutal and the Army must seek better winter quarters.  This will make Colonel Scammell’s job more difficult as he tries to maintain the Army’s strength, as many Soldiers will want to return home in December as many contracts are over at year’s end.  My job will be to try and convince Soldiers to stay on with the Army as we go to winter quarters.  It is a constant challenge for every Officer to maintain a good spirit and convince others to maintain their enlistments.

It is getting very late and my fingers are once again stiff and cold.  I will write again when it is possible; I remain your Loving and Humble Husband, Lieutenant JR Reynolds.

** The Tools of the trade have changed over the years, but the heart of the AG Soldier is little different today from that of Lieutenant Reynolds, Aide to Colonel Pickering, The AG of the Army, 1777-1779. **

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