Adjutant General's Corps Regimental Association

AG Corps Soldiers (Adjutants & Musicians) Awarded the Medal of Honor

The History of the Medal of Honor

          The Medal of Honor is the nation’s highest medal for valor in combat that can be awarded to members of the Armed Forces. The medal was first authorized in 1861 for Sailors and Marines, and the following year for Soldiers as well.  Since then, more than 3,400 Medals of Honor have been awarded to members of all DoD services and the Coast Guard.  Early in the Civil War, a medal for individual valor was proposed to General-in-Chief of the Army Winfield Scott.  But General Scott felt medals smacked of European affectation and killed the idea.  The medal found support in the Navy, however, where it was felt recognition of courage in strife was needed. So on December 9, 1861 Iowa Senator James W. Grimes introduced Public Resolution 82 in the United States Senate, a bill designed to “promote the efficiency of the Navy” by authorizing the production and distribution of “medals of honor.”  On December 21st the bill was passed, authorizing 200 such medals be produced, “which shall be bestowed upon such Petty Officers, Seamen, Landsmen and Marines as shall distinguish themselves by their gallantry in action and other seamanlike qualities during the present war (Civil War).”  President Lincoln signed the bill and the (Navy) Medal of Honor was born.
          Shortly afterwards, a resolution similar in wording was introduced on behalf of the Army and signed into law on July 12, 1862.  The measure provided for awarding a medal of honor, “to such Noncommissioned Officers and Privates as shall most distinguish themselves by their gallantry in action, and other Soldier like qualities, during the present insurrection (Civil War).”  Although it was created for the Civil War, Congress made the Medal of Honor a permanent decoration in 1863.

AG Corps Soldiers Awarded the Medal of Honor

          58 AG Corps Soldiers have been awarded the Medal of Honor. This includes 18 Adjutants and 40 Musicians. The first AG Corps Medal of Honor awarded was to George H. Palmer on 20 September 1861. George Palmer volunteered to fight in the trenches at Lexington, MO during the Civil War and led a charge which resulted in the recapture of a Union hospital, together with Confederate sharpshooters then occupying the same. The most recent AG Corps Medal of Honor recipient was Calvin P. Titus for actions in Peking, China on 14 August 1900. Calvin Titus executed gallant and daring conduct in the presence of his Colonel, other Officers and Enlisted men of his regiment and was the first to scale the wall of the city in an assault. The youngest AG Corps Medal of Honor recipient was Willie Johnston, a drummer, 12 years old. Willie Johnston’s service during the Union’s Seven Days retreat in the Peninsula Campaign was exemplary. He was the only drummer in his division to come away with his instrument, during a general rout. His superiors considered this a meritorious feat, when fellow Soldiers had thrown away their guns.
          Although the Medal of Honor information collected from the Congressional Medal of Honor Society (website – http://www.cmohs.org/recipient-archive.php) for these AG Corps Soldiers varies from few details, to a full accounting of the Soldier’s bravery in combat, each Soldier earned the United States’ highest medal for valor in combat. They bring great credit and distinction to the AG Corps’ long and distinguished history since 1775.

ARCHER, JAMES W.
Rank:  First Lieutenant / Adjutant
Organization:  U.S. Army
Division:  59th Indiana Infantry
Birth:  Edgar, Illinois
Entered Service At:  Spencer, Indiana
Date of Issue:  08/02/1897
Place / Date:  At Corinth, Mississippi, 4 October 1862
Citation:  Voluntarily took command of another Regiment, with the consent of one or more of his seniors, who were present, rallied the command and led it in the assault.

 

 

 

BEAUMONT, EUGENE B.
Rank:  Major / Assistant Adjutant General
Organization:  U.S. Army
Division:  Cavalry Corps, Army of the Mississippi
Born:  Luzerne County, Pennsylvania
Entered Service At:  Wilkes Barre, Pennsylvania
Date of Issue:  03/30/1898
Place / Date:  At Harpeth River, Tennessee, 17 December 1864; at Selma, Alabama, 2 April 1865
Citation:  Obtained permission from the Corps Commander to advance upon the enemy’s position with the 4th U.S. Cavalry, of which he was a Lieutenant; led an attack upon a battery, dispersed the enemy, and captured the guns.  At Selma, Alabama, charged at the head of his Regiment, into the second and last line of the enemy’s works.

ESTES, LEWELLYN G.
Rank:  Captain / Assistant Adjutant General
Organization:  U.S. Army
Division:  U.S. Volunteers
Born:  Oldtown, Maine
Entered Service At:  Penobscot, Maine
Place / Date:  At Flint River, Georgia, 30 August 1864
Citation:  Voluntarily led troops in a charge over a burning bridge.  Late in the afternoon of August 30, 1864, General Howard’s advancing Union Infantry camped about four miles from the Flint River in Georgia.  Without water for his exhausted troops, General Howard asked Captain Lewellyn Estes if he would take his Cavalry in an effort to get water from the river for the troops. Valiantly, at the head of his command, Captain Estes led the 96th Illinois Cavalry on a charge against the Confederate barricade at the river. Within an hour his fierce charge, which had caught the rebels entirely by surprise, scattered the enemy force and sent them across the river. Returning to his command, and upon being congratulated by General Howard, Captain Estes asked, “Do you want me to take the bridge.”  “Can you do it?” General Howard asked. Captain Estes replied that he could and, with the General’s permission, led two Regiments of dismounted cavalry back to the river. With two companies of the 10th Ohio, Captain Estes charged across the bridge to rout the enemy.  At the time of his charge the bridge was burning in several places, but armed only with a revolver, Captain Estes continued at the head of his men, crossing and driving the enemy back far enough for the rest of General Howard’s Army to also cross.  From The Papers of Andrew Johnson: April-August 1868: “Lewellyn G. Estes (1843-1905), a lumberman, earned the Medal of Honor while serving as a staff officer for General Judson Kilpatrick, and after the war was brevetted Brigadier General.  In April 1866 he became collector of internal revenue in the Second District of North Carolina, and many years later he occupied himself in Washington, D.C., primarily as a lawyer and druggist. 

MILLS, ALBERT L.
Rank:  Captain / Assistant Adjutant General
Organization:  U.S. Army
Division:  U.S. Volunteers
Born:  New York, NY
Entered Service At:  New York, NY
Date of Issue:  07/09/1902
Place / Date:  Near Santiago, Cuba, 1 July 1898
Citation:  Distinguished gallantry in encouraging those near him by his bravery and coolness after being shot through the head and entirely without sight.

STEVENS, HAZARD
Rank:  Captain / Assistant Adjutant General
Organization:  U.S. Army
Division:  U.S. Volunteers
Born:  9 June 1842, Newport, Rhode Island
Entered Service At:  Olympia, Washington Territory
Place / Date:  At Fort Huger, Virginia, 19 April 1863
Citation:  Gallantly led a party that assaulted and captured the fort.

 

 

WEIR, HENRY C.
Rank:  Captain / Assistant Adjutant General
Organization:  U.S. Army
Division:  U.S. Volunteers
Born:  West Point, N.Y.
Place / Date:  At St. Mary’s Church, Virginia, 24 June 1864
Citation:  The division being hard pressed and falling back, this officer dismounted, gave his horse to a wounded officer, and thus enabled him to escape.  Afterwards, on foot, Captain Weir rallied and took command of some stragglers and helped to repel the last charge of the enemy.

 

 

 

BAIRD, GEORGE W.
Rank:  First Lieutenant / Adjutant
Organization:  U.S. Army
Division:  5th U.S. Infantry
Born:  Connecticut
Entered Service At:  Milford, Connecticut
Place / Date:  At Bear Paw Mountain, Montana, 30 September 1877
Citation:  Most distinguished gallantry in action with the Nez Perce Indians.

 

 

 

 

DOUGALL, ALLAN H.
Rank:  First Lieutenant/Adjutant
Organization:  U.S. Army
Division:  88th Indiana Infantry
Born:  Scotland
Entered Service At:  New Haven, Allen County, Indiana
Date of Issue:  16 February 1897
Place / Date:  Battle of Bentonville, NC, 19 March 1865
Citation:  In the face of a galling fire from the enemy he voluntarily returned to where the color bearer had fallen wounded and saved the flag of his Regiment from capture.

 

 

 

FERRIS, EUGENE W.
Rank:  First Lieutenant / Adjutant
Organization:  U.S. Army
Division:  30th Massachusetts Infantry
Born:  Springfield, Vermont
Entered Service At:  Lowell, Massachusetts
Place / Date:  At Berryville, Virginia, 1 April 1865
Citation:  Accompanied only by an orderly, outside the lines of the Army, he gallantly resisted an attack of 5 of Mosby’s cavalry, mortally wounded the leader of the party, seized his horse and pistols, wounded 3 more, and, though wounded himself, escaped.

 

 

GERE, THOMAS P.
Rank:  First Lieutenant / Adjutant
Organization:  U.S. Army
Division:  5th Minnesota Infantry
Born:  Chemung County, NY
Place / Date:  At Nashville, Tennessee, 16 December 1864
Citation:  Capture of flag of 4th Mississippi (C.S.A.).

 

 

LIVINGSTON, JOSIAH O.
Rank:  First Lieutenant / Adjutant
Organization:  U.S. Army
Division:  9th Vermont Infantry
Born:  Walden, Vermont
Entered Service At:  Marshfield, Vermont
Place / Date:  At Newport Barracks, NC, 2 February 1864
Citation:  When, after desperate resistance, the small garrison had been driven back to the river by a vastly superior force, this officer, while a small force held back the enemy, personally fired the railroad bridge, and although wounded himself, assisted a wounded officer over the burning structure.

 

 

MACARTHUR, ARTHUR, JR.
Rank:  First Lieutenant / Adjutant
Organization:  U.S. Army
Division:  24th Wisconsin Infantry
Born:  Springfield, Massachusetts
Entered Service At:  Milwaukee, Wisconsin
Place / Date:  At Missionary Ridge, Tennessee, 25 November 1863
Citation:  Seized the colors of his Regiment at a critical moment and planted them on the captured works on the crest of Missionary Ridge.  (Note – His son, Douglas MacArthur, was one of only five men promoted to the five-star rank of General of the Army during World War II.  In addition to their both being promoted to the rank of general officer, Arthur MacArthur, Jr. and Douglas MacArthur also share the distinction of having been the first father and son to each be awarded a Medal of Honor.)

SMITH, FRANCIS M.
Rank:  First Lieutenant / Adjutant
Organization:  U.S. Army
Division:  1st Maryland Infantry
Born:  Frederick, Maryland
Entered Service At:  Frederick, Maryland
Place / Date:  At Dabney Mills, Virginia, 6 February 1865
Citation:  Voluntarily remained with the body of his Regimental Commander under a heavy fire after the Brigade had retired and brought the body off the field.

 

 

TOBIN, JOHN M.
Rank:  First Lieutenant / Adjutant
Organization:  U.S. Army
Division:  9th Massachusetts Infantry
Born:  Ireland
Entered Service At:  Boston, Massachusetts
Place / Date:  At Malvern Hill, Virginia, 1 July 1862
Citation:  Voluntarily took command of the 9th Massachusetts while Adjutant, bravely fighting from 3 PM until dusk, rallying and re-forming the Regiment under fire; twice picked up the Regimental Flag, the color bearer having been shot down, and placed it in worthy hands.

 

 

WOODWARD, EVAN M.
Rank:  First Lieutenant / Adjutant
Organization:  U.S. Army
Division:  2d Pennsylvania Reserve Infantry
Born:  11 March 1838, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
Place / Date:  At Fredericksburg, Virginia, 13 December 1862
Citation:  Advanced between the lines, demanded and received the surrender of the 19th Georgia Infantry and captured their battle flag.

 

 

 

CLARK, CHARLES A.
Rank:  First Lieutenant / Adjutant
Organization:  U.S. Army
Division:  6th Maine Infantry
Born:  Sangerville, Maine
Place / Date:  At Brooks Ford, Virginia, 4 May 1863
Citation:  Having voluntarily taken command of his Regiment in the absence of its Commander, at great personal risk and with remarkable presence of mind and fertility of resource, led the command down an exceedingly precipitous embankment to the Rappahannock River and by his gallantry, coolness, and good judgment in the face of the enemy saved the command from capture or destruction.

 

 

EDGERTON, NATHAN H.
Rank:  First Lieutenant / Adjutant
Organization:  U.S. Army
Division:  6th U.S. Colored Troops
Entered Service At:  Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
Place / Date:  At Chapins Farm, Virginia, 29 September 1864
Citation:  Took up the flag after 3 color bearers had been shot down and bore it forward, though himself wounded.

 

 

GREENE, OLIVER D.
Rank:  Major / Assistant Adjutant General
Organization:  U.S. Army
Born:  25 January 1833, Scott, NY
Entered Service At:  Scott, NY
Place / Date:  At Antietam, Maryland, 17 September 1862
Citation:  Formed the columns under heavy fire and put them into position.

 

 

DAWSON, MICHAEL
Rank:  Trumpeter
Organization:  U.S. Army
Company:  Company H
Division:  6th U.S. Cavalry
Born:  Boston, Massachusetts
Place / Date:  At Sappa Creek, Kansas, 23 April 1875
Citation:  Gallantry in action.

 

 

 

 

KEENAN, BARTHOLOMEW T.
Rank:  Trumpeter
Organization:  U.S. Army
Company:  Company G
Division:  1st U.S. Cavalry
Born:  Brooklyn, NY
Place / Date:  At Chiricahua Mountains, Arizona, 20 October 1869
Citation:  Gallantry in action.

PAYNE, ISAAC
Rank:  Trumpeter
Organization:  U.S. Army
Division:  Indian Scouts
Born:  Mexico
Place / Date:  At Pecos River, Texas, 25 April 1875
Citation:  With 3 other men, he participated in a charge against 25 hostiles while on a scouting patrol.

SNOW, ELMER A.
Rank:  Trumpeter
Organization:  U.S. Army
Company:  Company M
Division:  3d U.S. Cavalry
Born:  Hardwick, Massachusetts
Place / Date:  At Rosebud Creek, Montana, 17 June 1876
Citation:  Bravery in action; was wounded in both arms.

 

 

 

FACTOR, POMPEY
Rank:  Principal Musician
Organization:  U.S. Army
Division:  Indian Scouts
Born:  Arkansas
Place / Date:  At Pecos River, Texas, 25 April 1875
Citation:  With 3 other men, he participated in a charge against 25 hostiles while on a scouting patrol.

 

 

 

 

GLYNN, MICHAEL
Rank:  Principal Musician
Organization:  U.S. Army
Company:  Company F
Division:  5th U.S. Cavalry
Born:  Ireland
Place / Date:  At Whetstone Mountains, Arizona, 13 July 1872
Citation:  Stove off, single-handed, 8 hostile Indians, killing and wounding 5.

HEARTERY, RICHARD
Rank:  Principal Musician
Organization:  U.S. Army
Company:  Company D
Division:  6th U.S. Cavalry
Born:  Ireland
Entered Service At:  San Francisco, California
Place / Date:  At Cibicu, Arizona, 30 August 1881
Citation:  Bravery in action.

PATTERSON, JOHN T.
Rank:  Principal Musician
Organization:  U.S. Army
Division:  122d Ohio Infantry
Born:  Morgan County, Ohio
Place / Date:  At Winchester, Virginia, 14 June 1863
Citation:  
Patterson joined the Union Army in McConnelsville on August 22, 1862.  He joined Company C of the 122nd Ohio Infantry, which mustered in on October 2, 1862.  He was promoted from Musician to Principal Musician on October 8 of that year.  On June 14, 1863, Patterson was wounded during the Second Battle of Winchester while he was rescuing a fellow soldier.  For his valor, he received the Medal of Honor.  After rescuing his fellow soldier, Patterson was taken prisoner and held for a time at Belle Isle and Libby Prison.  After being released he was present at the final Battle of Appomattox Court House, along with the rest of his regiment.  He was mustered out with his company on June 26, 1865.

SCHMIDT, WILLIAM
Rank:  Principal Musician
Organization:  U.S. Army
Company:  Company G
Division:  37th Ohio Infantry
Born:  Tiffin, Ohio
Entered Service At:  Maumee, Ohio
Place / Date:  At Missionary Ridge, Tennessee, 25 November 1863
Citation:  Rescued a wounded comrade under terrific fire.

SYPE, PETER
Rank:  Principal Musician
Organization:  U.S. Army
Company:  Company B
Division:  47th Ohio Infantry
Born:  11 October 1841, Monroe County, Michigan
Entered Service At:  Adrian, Michigan
Date of Issue:  09/12/1911
Place / Date:  At Vicksburg, Mississippi, 3 May 1863
Citation:  Was one of a party that volunteered and attempted to run the enemy’s batteries with a steam tug and 2 barges loaded with subsistence stores.
Coming to Monroe From Bavaria, Germany – By Gail Sype
http://www.monroenews.com/news/2014/feb/28/coming-monroe-bavaria-germany/
Christian Seip and his wife Maria Elisabeth, my great-great-grandparents, both from Bavaria, Germany, came to Monroe County, Michigan in the mid- to late-1830s.  They had a total of eight children during their marriage, but only three of these children survived into adulthood:  Johann Peter Sype (1841-1912), Maria Elisabeth Sype (1845-1914), and John Christoph Sype (1854-1912).  In 1860, Lincoln was elected president and around the time of his inauguration in 1861, several southern states seceded because they thought Lincoln’s election would force an end to slavery.  Thus the “War of the Rebellion” was launched.  Johann Peter (my great-grandfather), who went by the name Peter Sype through his lifetime, like many young men, wanted the excitement and adventure that he thought serving in the war would bring.  Family folklore indicates that he had originally enlisted in a Michigan unit and that his mother went to the Army leadership and took him out, since he was still officially a minor.  But Peter was not to be deterred from embarking on his military career and enlisted as a Private at Adrian on June 15, 1861.  By the time he enlisted, Michigan had met its quota of Soldiers for the war and so the Adrian unit became part of the 47th Ohio Volunteer Infantry and became part of Company B.  Company B saw service in Virginia and West Virginia before being sent to Mississippi to be a part of the attack on Vicksburg, Mississippi.  Vicksburg was a key target because it was essential to the success of both the Confederacy and the Union.  The union forces engaged in a long series of attacks with the goal of seizing control of the city from the rebels.  Peter Sype was part of a group of soldiers who volunteered to guard a shipment of goods that the Union attempted to run past the Confederate blockade at Vicksburg.  This attempt was made on the moonlit night of May 3, 1863, and the Union forces were both shot at and shelled by the rebel forces.  One of the shells made a direct hit on the steamship that was transporting the goods and the ship disappeared in a hail of steam and fire.  Peter Sype had an opportunity to make it back to the Louisiana side of the river but gave up his spot on a plank of wood (a remnant of the steamship) to other Soldiers.  Of the original group of 35 Soldiers guarding the ship, 16 were captured by the Confederates and held as prisoners of war, including Peter.  Another four men made it back to the Union forces on the western side of the river.  The rest perished in the fire and hail of bullets.  Peter and the other members of his unit who survived were nominated for the Medal of Honor for “gallantry in running the blockades at Vicksburg.”  Peter Sype continued to serve with the 47th Ohio Infantry until June, 1864, when he was wounded near Kennesaw Mountain, Georgia.  He was mustered out after he recovered from his wound.  The picture that is attached is of him when he returned from the war.  He married Marie Louise Doederlein in 1870 and they had 10 children, eight of whom survived to adulthood.  Peter Sype is buried in Trinity Lutheran cemetery and his grave marker indicates he was a Medal of Honor recipient.  He also is recognized on the new Civil War monument at Soldiers and Sailors Park on E. Front Street in Monroe.

BAKER, JOHN
Rank:  Musician
Organization:  U.S. Army
Company:  Company D
Division:  5th U.S. Infantry
Born:  Germany
Entered Service At:  Brooklyn, NY
Date of Issue:  05/01/1968
Accredited To:  Moline, Illinois
Place / Date:  At Cedar Creek, Montana, October 1876 to January 1877
Citation:  Gallantry in engagements.

CARSON, WILLIAM J.
Rank:  Musician
Organization:  U.S. Army
Company:  Company E, 1st Battalion
Division:  15th U.S. Infantry
Born:  Washington County, Pennsylvania
Entered Service At:  North Greenfield, Ohio
Place / Date:  At Chickamauga, Georgia, 19 September 1863
Citation:  At a critical stage in the battle when the 14th Corps lines were wavering and in disorder he on his own initiative bugled “to the colors” amid the 18th U.S. Infantry who formed by him, and held the enemy.  Within a few minutes he repeated his action amid the wavering 2d Ohio Infantry.  This bugling deceived the enemy who believed reinforcements had arrived.  Thus, they delayed their attack.

 

CLANCY, JOHN E.
Rank:  Musician
Organization:  U.S. Army
Company:  Company E
Division:  1st U.S. Artillery
Born:  New York, NY
Place / Date:  At Wounded Knee Creek, South Dakota, 29 December 1890
Citation:  Twice voluntarily rescued wounded comrades under fire of the enemy.

 

ENDERLIN, RICHARD
Rank:  Musician
Organization:  U.S. Army
Company:  Company B
Division:  73d Ohio Infantry
Born:  Germany
Entered Service At:  Chillicothe, Ohio
Place / Date:  At Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, 1-3 July 1863
Citation:  Voluntarily took a rifle and served as a Soldier in the ranks during the first and second days of the battle.  Voluntarily and at his own imminent peril went into the enemy’s lines at night and, under a sharp fire, rescued a wounded comrade.

 

 

HILLIKER, BENJAMIN F.
Rank:  Musician
Organization:  U.S. Army
Company:  Company A
Division:  8th Wisconsin Infantry
Born:  23 May 1843, Golden, Erie County, NY
Entered Service At:  Waupaca Township, Wisconsin
Place / Date:  At Mechanicsburg, Mississippi, 4 June 1863
Citation:  When men were needed to oppose a superior Confederate force he laid down his drum for a rifle and proceeded to the front of the skirmish line which was about 120 feet from the enemy.  While on this volunteer mission and firing at the enemy he was hit in the head with a minie ball which passed through him.  An order was given to “lay him in the shade; he won’t last long.”  He recovered from this wound being left with an ugly scar.

HOWE, ORION P.
Rank:  Musician
Organization:  U.S. Army
Company:  Company C
Division:  55th Illinois Infantry
Born:  Portage County, Ohio
Entered Service At:  Waukegan, Illinois
Place / Date:  At Vicksburg, Mississippi, 19 May 1863
Citation:  A drummer boy, 14 years of age, and severely wounded and exposed to a heavy fire from the enemy, he persistently remained upon the field of battle until he had reported to General W. T. Sherman the necessity of supplying cartridges for the use of troops under command of Colonel Malmborg.

 

JOHNSTON, WILLIE
Rank:  Musician
Organization:  U.S. Army
Company:  Company D
Division:  3d Vermont Infantry
Born:  Morristown, NY
Entered Service At:  St. Johnsbury, Vermont
Citation:  Date and place of act not on record in War Department.  William “Willie” Johnston (born July 1850), from St. Johnsbury, Vermont, was a drummer boy in Company D of the 3rd Vermont Infantry.  His service during the Seven Days retreat in the Peninsula Campaign was exemplary.  He was the only drummer in his Division to come away with his instrument, during a general rout.  His superiors considered this a meritorious feat, when fellow Soldiers had thrown away their guns.  As a result, he received the Medal of Honor on the recommendation of his Division Commander, thereby becoming the youngest recipient of the military’s highest decoration at 13 years of age.

KOUNTZ, JOHN S.
Rank:  Musician
Organization:  U.S. Army
Company:  Company G
Division:  37th Ohio Infantry
Born:  Maumee, Ohio
Entered Service At:  Maumee, Ohio
Place / Date:  At Missionary Ridge, Tennessee, 25 November 1863
Citation:  Seized a musket and joined in the charge in which he was severely wounded.

 

LANGBEIN, J.C. JULIUS
Rank:  Musician
Organization:  U.S. Army
Company:  Company B
Division:  9th New York Infantry
Born:  29 September 1846, Germany
Entered Service At:  New York, NY
Place / Date:  At Camden, NC, 19 April 1862
Citation:  A drummer boy, 15 years of age, he voluntarily and under a heavy fire went to the aid of a wounded officer, procured medical assistance for him, and aided in carrying him to a place of safety.

 

 

LORD, WILLIAM
Rank:  Musician
Organization:  U.S. Army
Company:  Company C
Division:  40th Massachusetts Infantry
Born:  England
Entered Service At:  Lawrence, Massachusetts
Place / Date:  At Drurys Bluff, Virginia, 16 May 1864
Citation:  Went to the assistance of a wounded officer lying helpless between the lines, and under fire from both sides removed him to a place of safety.

McLENNON, JOHN
Rank:  Musician
Organization:  U.S. Army
Company:  Company A
Division:  7th U.S. Infantry
Born:  Fort Belknap, Texas
Place / Date:  At Big Hole, Montana, 9 August 1877
Citation:  Gallantry in action.

 

MURPHY, ROBINSON B.
Rank:  Musician
Organization:  U.S. Army
Company:  Company A
Division:  127th Illinois Infantry
Born:  Oswego, Kendall County, Illinois
Entered Service At:  Oswego, Kendall County, Illinois
Place / Date:  At Atlanta, Georgia, 28 July 1864
Citation:  Being Orderly Sergeant to the Brigade Commander, he voluntarily led two Regiments as reinforcements into line of battle, where he had his horse shot from underneath him.  Note – The First Sergeant was also known as the “Orderly Sergeant.”  As the senior NCO in the Company he was responsible for a lot of Company paperwork and he was in charge of all the other NCOs.  He would assign fatigue duty and punishments and was generally not very popular with the men.  He would form up the Company and take the roll call and get it all in ranks and organized before turning the company over to the officer in command.  During drill or in battle the First Sergeant was also the company’s Right Guide.  In line of battle his post was on the right of the Company, in the rear rank, immediately behind the Captain who was in the front rank.  If the Battalion went into a column however, the Captain would have to step out in front of the middle of the Company so the First Sergeant would step up into the front rank “covering” the Captain, so the First Sergeant was also referred to as the “Covering Sergeant.”  During certain maneuvers the First Sergeant would also have specific positions and responsibilities.

PALMER, GEORGE H.
Rank:  Musician
Organization:  U.S. Army
Division:  1st Illinois Cavalry
Born:  New York
Entered Service At:  Illinois
Place / Date:  At Lexington, Missouri, 20 September 1861
Citation:  Volunteered to fight in the trenches and also led a charge which resulted in the recapture of a Union hospital, together with Confederate sharpshooters then occupying the same.  The Journal of Major George H. Palmer can be found at:
http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~luff/PalmerGH_Journal.html#lexington

 

 

PFISTERER, HERMAN
Rank:  Musician
Organization:  U.S. Army
Company:  Company H
Division:  21st U.S. Infantry
Born:  Brooklyn, NY
Entered Service At:  New York, NY
Place / Date:  At Santiago, Cuba, 1 July 1898
Citation:  Gallantly assisted in the rescue of the wounded from in front of the lines and under heavy fire from the enemy.

SNEDDEN, JAMES
Rank:  Musician
Organization:  U.S. Army
Company:  Company E
Division:  54th Pennsylvania Infantry
Born:  Scotland
Entered Service At:  Johnstown, Pennsylvania
Place / Date:  At Piedmont, Virginia, 5 June 1864
Citation:  Left his place in the rear, took the rifle of a disabled soldier, and fought through the remainder of the action.

 

 

 

TITUS, CALVIN PEARL
Rank:  Musician
Organization:  U.S. Army
Company:  Company E
Division:  14th U.S. Infantry
Born:  Vinton, Iowa
Entered Service At:  Iowa
Date of Issue:  03/11/1902
Place / Date:  At Peking, China, 14 August 1900
Citation:  Gallant and daring conduct in the presence of his Colonel and other Officers and Enlisted men of his Regiment; was first to scale the wall of the city.

 

WEBBER, ALASON P.
Rank:  Musician
Organization:  U.S. Army
Division:  86th Illinois Infantry
Born:  Greene County, NY
Entered Service At:  Illinois
Place / Date:  At Kennesaw Mountain, Georgia, 27 June 1864
Citation:  Voluntarily joined in a charge against the enemy, which was repulsed, and by his rapid firing in the face of the enemy enabled many of the wounded to return to the Federal lines.  With others, held the advance of the enemy while temporary works were being constructed.

 

HORSFALL, WILLIAM H.
Rank:  Drummer
Organization:  U.S. Army
Company:  Company G
Division:  1st Kentucky Infantry
Born:  Campbell County, Kentucky
Place / Date: At Corinth, Mississippi, 21 May 1862
Citation:  Saved the life of a wounded officer lying between the lines.

 

 

MAGEE, WILLIAM
Rank:  Drummer
Organization:  U.S. Army
Company:  Company C
Division:  33d New Jersey Infantry
Born:  Newark, N.J.
Place / Date:  At Murfreesboro, Tennessee, 5 December 1864
Citation:  In a charge, was among the first to reach a battery of the enemy and with one or two others, mounted the artillery horses and
took two guns into the Union lines.

SCOTT, JULIAN A.
Rank:  Drummer
Organization:  U.S. Army
Company:  Company E
Division:  3d Vermont Infantry
Born:  Johnson, Vermont
Entered Service At:  Johnson, Vermont
Place / Date:  At Lees Mills, Virginia, 16 April 1862
Citation:  Crossed the creek under a terrific fire of musketry several times to assist in bringing off the wounded.

LANDIS, JAMES P.
Rank:  Chief Bugler
Organization:  U.S. Army
Division:  1st Pennsylvania Cavalry
Born:  Mifflin County, Pennsylvania
Place / Date:  At Paines Crossroads, Virginia, 5 April 1865
Citation:  Capture of flag.

 

ROHM, FERDINAND F.
Rank:  Chief Bugler
Organization:  U.S. Army
Division:  16th Pennsylvania Cavalry
Born:  Jumata County, Pennsylvania
Entered Service At:  Jumata County, Pennsylvania
Place / Date:  At Reams Station, Virginia, 25 August 1864
Citation:  While his regiment was retiring under fire, he voluntarily remained behind to secure a wounded officer who was in great danger, secured assistance, and removed the officer to a place of safety.

SCHORN, CHARLES
Rank:  Chief Bugler
Organization:  U.S. Army
Company:  Company M
Division:  1st West Virginia Cavalry
Born:  Germany
Entered Service At:  Mason City, West Virginia
Place / Date:  At Appomattox, Virginia, 8 April 1865
Citation:  Capture of flag of the Sumter Flying Artillery (C.S.A.).

 

 

WELLS, THOMAS M.
Rank:  Chief Bugler
Organization:  U.S. Army
Division:  6th New York Cavalry
Born:  Ireland
Entered Service At:  DeKalb, NY
Place / Date:  At Cedar Creek, Virginia, 19 October 1864
Citation:  Capture of colors of 44th Georgia Infantry (C.S.A.).

 

COOK, JOHN
Rank:  Bugler
Organization:  U.S. Army
Company:  Battery B
Division:  4th U.S. Artillery
Born:  Hamilton County, Ohio
Entered Service At:  Cincinnati, Ohio
Place / Date: At Antietam Maryland, 17 September 1862
Citation:  Volunteered at the age of 15 years to act as a cannoneer, and as such volunteer served a gun under a terrific fire of the enemy.

 

GATES, GEORGE
Rank:  Bugler
Organization:  U.S. Army
Company:  Company F
Division:  8th U.S. Cavalry
Born:  Delaware County, Ohio
Place / Date:  At Picacho Mountain, Arizona, 4 June 1869
Citation:  Killed an Indian warrior and captured his arms

 

HOOVER, SAMUEL
Rank:  Chief Bugler
Organization:  U.S. Army
Company:  Company A
Division:  1st U.S. Cavalry
Born:  Dauphin County, Pennsylvania
Place / Date:  At Santa Maria Mountains, Arizona, 6 May 1873
Citation:  Gallantry in action.

LITTLE, THOMAS
Rank:  Chief Bugler
Organization:  U.S. Army
Company:  Company B
Division:  8th U.S. Cavalry
Born:  West Indies
Place / Date:  Arizona, August to October 1868
Citation:  Bravery in scouts and actions against Indians.

 

REED, CHARLES W.
Rank:  Bugler
Organization:  U.S. Army
Company:  9th Independent Battery
Division:  Massachusetts Light Artillery
Born:  Charlestown, Massachusetts
Place / Date: At Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, 2 July 1863
Citation:  Rescued his wounded Captain from between the lines.

 

 

WINDUS, CLARON A.
Rank:  Bugler
Organization:  U.S. Army
Company:  Company L
Division:  6th U.S. Cavalry
Born:  Janesville, Wisconsin
Place / Date:  At Wichita River, Texas, 12 July 1870
Citation:  Gallantry in action.  Claron Windus is the only Medal of Honor winner who shot and killed another Medal of Honor winner.  Claron “Gus” Windus was born in Janesville, Wisconsin in 1849.  He was educated in the newly formed Janesville public schools.  In 1864, at age 15, he ran away from home.  He was desperate to join the state volunteers, so he lied about his age and got into the Fifth Wisconsin Infantry as a drummer.  He was itching for combat.  His wish came true during the siege of Petersburg, Virginia, and he found it to his liking.
After the war, he lied about his age again and joined the United States Army.  At the age of seventeen, Windus was sent to Texas as a bugler with Company L of the Sixth United States Cavalry.  The hard and often monotonous life of frontier duty didn’t sit well with the teenager.  He was court-martialed in 1868 for desertion and theft.  His punishment was twelve months hard labor.  It straightened him out.
Ready and willing to return to the Cavalry, by 1870, Windus was back in the saddle with Company L.  Here’s the official account of what happened next… Under the command of CPT Curwen B. McLellan, a mixed troop from Companies A, H, K, and L was dispatched to recover the mail from Indians who had attacked a mail coach near Fort Richardson on July 6, 1870.  The force of fifty-eight men followed the trail of a small group of Indians until July 11, when nightfall found them on the south bank of the North Fork of the Little Wichita River, some forty miles northwest of Fort Richardson.  On July 12, after they were unable to cross the river because of heavy rains on July 10 and 11, they were attacked by a band of Kiowa Indians.  The ensuing battle came to be known as the battle of the Little Wichita River.  Windus was both bugler and Orderly Sergeant and assisted a wounded Army surgeon, George W. Hatch, in caring for the Soldiers.  He also assisted in successfully clearing of enemy snipers from prominent elevations.  On the morning of July 13, Windus and SGT George Eldridge volunteered to go to Fort Richardson for help.  They eluded several Indian search parties and brought relief to the beleaguered command.  Windus and twelve others were recommended for the Medal of Honor by CPT McLellan for “conspicuous acts of bravery.”
Private Adam Paine of the United States Cavalry’s Indian Scouts was a Mascogo – a Black Seminole – descendants of slaves and free
Africans who joined the Seminole Indians in Florida in the 1700’s and 1800’s.  He was described by his commanding officer, Colonel Ranald S. Mackenzie, as having “more cool daring than any scout I have ever known.”  In 1877, Claron Windus was the Deputy Sheriff of Brackettville, Texas – a small town near the Mexican border – and Adam Paine was a fugitive from the law.  Paine was discharged from the Cavalry in 1875.  He had spent the past year drifting back and forth across the border with a known cattle thief named Frank Enoch.  Paine had reportedly stabbed and killed a white Soldier in Brownsville and now he had returned with Enoch and two other ex-scouts to celebrate New Year’s with their people, the Mascogo community of Brackettville.  Windus got wind of the fugitive’s arrival and made plans to arrest them.  Early on New Year’s morning, 1877, Windus and a small posse arrived at the Mascogo’s New Year’s celebration.  Windus saw Paine, walked up to him, stuck a two barrelled shotgun in his belly and pulled the trigger.  The ex-Buffalo Soldier was shot at such close range that his clothing caught fire.  Windus then turned, pulled out a six shooter and shot Enoch.  In the ensuing confusion, the other two men, Isaac Payne (another Medal of Honor winner) and Dallas Griner, leapt on nearby horses and fled to Mexico.  They were later cleared of charges of horse theft and re-enlisted as scouts.
Less than a month after Adam Paine’s death, Windus resigned as Deputy Sheriff in order to become Kinney County Assessor of Taxes.  The next month he married Agnes Ballantyne and within a few years had become one of the largest landowners in the country by purchasing land sold at delinquent tax sales.  By 1897 he was so wealthy that his house was the first in Brackettville to have indoor plumbing.  In 1898 he volunteered for the war in Cuba and spent a year there – his third, and final war.  Claron Windus was born and raised a Wisconsinite, but he died a Texan… in 1927 in Brackettville – a town that has the unusual distinction of having the gravestones of five Congressional Medal of Honor winners.  It is also the site of the only known killing of one Medal of Honor winner by another.  Four of the five Medal of Honor recipients buried in Brackettville were Seminole Mascogo Indian Scouts: Adam Paine, Isaac Payne, John Ward and Pompey Factor.  The fifth is Claron Windus.
http://wisconsinology.blogspot.com/2008/05/claron-windus-only-medal-of-honor.html

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History – Adjutant General’s Corps Regimental Activation

Photo above – MG William G. O’Leksy (far right) dedicated the Adjutant General’s Corps Colors and activated the Corps (Regiment) in ceremonies at Fort Benjamin Harrison on 17 June 1987. Photo by Shirley Startzman.

By COL (Ret) Frank C. Foster, Jr.
(Article first written and published in the Summer of 1987)

On 17 June 1987, the 212th Anniversary of the Adjutant General’s Corps, the Adjutant General’s Corps Regiment was activated at the home of the Corps, Fort Benjamin Harrison. This special occasion united key members of the Corps from around the world to celebrate the Regiment as a focal point of pride and energy. The festivities started early 16 June with a 12 event Regimental Athletic day. LTC Arthur Dupay led a team from Fort Jackson, South Carolina, to capture gold honors. Over 870 Regimental Crest medals were awarded for individual excellence. The entire athletic day was managed by MSG Dewey Williams and Noncommissioned Officers of the Adjutant General’s Corps. Competition was keen and enthusiasm high as hundreds of participating AG Soldiers agreed to continue the event as an annual competition. Soldiers participated in swimming, softball, horseshoes, litter carry, combat push ball, sprint relays and 5K and 10K races.

The Club Management School, under MAJ George “Pete” Martin, hosted a “Reunion Buffet” for all Officers and Noncommissioned Officers. Music, an ice carving and a buffet capped by a sailboat full of shrimp were all part of the festivities. BG Ronald Brooks unveiled a plaque dedicating the Regimental Mess for both the Officer and Noncommissioned Officer Clubs at Fort Harrison.

Activation day began early with Regimental workshops organized by MAJ Gary Williams meeting to concentrate on key issues facing the Corps now and in the future. LTC Mike Shane chaired a workshop on Officer issues with the help of MG (Ret) Verne Bowers. LTC Don Traub led a workshop on Enlisted issues; he was assisted by BG Brooks. The third workshop concentrating on Adjutant General’s Corps issues was overseen by MG William O’Leksy and guided by MAJ Dennis Marcel.

After a quick lunch, the crowds gathered for dedication of the Adjutant General School entrance at the south end of Gates-Lord Hall. The guest speaker, BG “Lex” Dilworth, The Adjutant General, presented a beautiful three panel plaque to the Noncommissioned Officers of the Adjutant General’s Corps. The plaque which shows the forging of the Enlisted Adjutant General insignia will become the centerpiece of the new Adjutant General “NCO” Hall of Professional Development. Once BG Dilworth and COL Frank C. Foster, Jr. cut the ribbon, visitors entered the beautifully paneled hall.

Two glass wall cases showed historical AG displays. The first display depicted MG Horatio Gates, the first Adjutant General and “Hero of the Battle of Saratoga.” The second display was dedicated to BG Archibald Campbell, “Warrior Adjutant General” and Assistant, The Adjutant General. A special circular case presented the new Regimental Order of Horatio Gates in both gold and bronze editions. The main wall greeting visitors displays pictures of all The Adjutants General since 1775. This exhibit was donated by BG Dilworth from his former Adjutant General office in the Pentagon. The entrance way was built by SSG Michael Bigos and supervised by the Regimental SGM Eddie Bass. The displays were designed by CPT David Niekerk. The official activation ceremony was held on the parade ground following the dedication. British Army MAJ Robert Dibley acted as narrator, reflecting the fact that Horatio Gates was a British Major before his appointment as our first Adjutant General.

SGM Eddie Bell passes the new Regimental colors to COL Frank Foster, Jr. with BG Robert L. Dillworth and MG William G. O’Leksy on 17 June 1987.

The Officers and Noncommissioned Officers of the Corps stood proud behind the colors of the units that comprise the Adjutant General’s Corps. The Commander of Troops was COL Mary C. Willis, Commander of Troop Brigade. The ceremony featured the unveiling of the Adjutant General’s Corps Regimental Flag which depicts the American eagle on a blue background with the words “Adjutant General’s Corps” on a scroll underneath. The Regimental Motto, “Defend and Serve,” is on a scroll held in the beak of the eagle. MG William G. O’Leksy, Director of Military Personnel Management, Office of the Deputy Chief of Staff for Personnel, was given the honor of officially dedicating the AG Colors and activating the Adjutant General’s Corps Regiment. The ceremony was attended by representatives and colors from the following units:

• Chicago MEPS
• Detroit MEPS
• 14th AG Battalion, Fort Jackson, SC
• 30th AG Battalion, Fort Benning, GA
• 42nd AG Battalion, Fort Dix, NJ
• 43rd AG Battalion, Fort Leonard Wood, MO
• 46th AG Battalion, Fort Knox, KY
• 67th AG Battalion, Fort Bliss, TX
• 95th AG Battalion, Fort Sill, OK
• 120th AG Battalion, Fort Jackson, SC
• 369th AG Battalion, Fort Jackson, SC
• 100th Reception Battalion, Louisville, KY
• 21st Replacement Battalion, Frankfurt, Germany
• 347th Replacement Battalion, Marion, IL
• 1st Personnel and Administration Battalion, Fort Hood, TX
• 18th Personnel and Administration Battalion, Fort Bragg, NC
• 22nd Personnel and Administration Battalion, Frankfurt, Germany
• 38th Personnel and Administration Battalion, Stuttgart, Germany
• 90th Personnel and Administration Battalion, Kaiserslautern, Germany
• 326th Personnel and Administration Battalion, Indianapolis, IN
• 335th Personnel and Administration Battalion, Butler, PA
• 387th Personnel and Administration Battalion, Wichita, KS

Troops stand behind the colors of the units that comprise the Adjutant General’s Corps Regiment.

Part of the activation ceremony included the investiture of the three Honorary Members of the Regiment and their award of the Order of Horatio Gates in Gold. MG (Ret) Verne L. Bowers was invested as the Honorary Colonel of the Regiment, CW4 (Ret) Donald E. Hess as Honorary Warrant Officer of the Regiment, and SGM (Ret) Daniel P. Daly as Honorary Sergeant Major of the Regiment.

The “Grand Finale” was the Adjutant General’s Corps Regimental Ball held that evening, under the planning of LTC “Dick” Cregar. Most significant was the award of the Order of Horatio Gates which was bestowed upon many distinguished Officers and Noncommissioned Officers that have made a significant contribution to the good of the Corps.

The Soldier Support Advocate was an early prelude to today’s 1775, the Journal of the Adjutant General’s Corps Regimental Association.

Other key events of the evening included a musical tribute to the Regiment written and sung by MAJ Curtis B. Taylor, with assistance by MAJs Robert J. Malkemes and Keith H. Williams of the Adjutant General School Advanced Officer Training Division. The “Salute to the Corps” was written and choreographed by the Team Leaders / Members of that division.

The evening concluded with the Grand Tattoo. The ceremonial Tattoo was commanded by LTC Joseph Greenlee with music provided by the 74th Army Band, who also introduced the Adjutant General’s Corps Regimental March. The Regimental March was written by CPT William A. Foss.

Pictured is a copy of the original AG Corps Regimental March put to music by CPT William A. Foss.

AGCRA Editor’s Note:  Re-publication of AR 870-21, The U.S. Army Regimental System on April 13th, 2017 officially eliminated the term AG Corps Regiment.  The Corps is now a separate Corps and simply called the Adjutant General’s Corps or AG Corps.

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Adjutant General’s Corps History

The proud heritage of the Adjutant General’s Corps dates back to the formation of the American Army when on 16 June 1775, the Continental Congress established the position of Adjutant General on the staff of General George Washington.  On 17 June, Congress selected Horatio Gates, a former officer in the British Army, to become the first Adjutant General of the Army with the commission of Brigadier General.  General Gates made good use of his knowledge of military organization by bringing good order and regularity to the Army by transforming militia units from the 13 colonies into one “American Army.”  General Gates developed the system by which regular strength returns were compiled and reported up through the Army’s chain-of-command.  The first report was completed on 19 July 1775, and established the basis of the “personnel system” used to compile personnel and strength information for the remainder of the war.

Over the course of its long and distinguished history, the Adjutant General’s Corps has become responsible for several critical personnel and administrative support functions that have served to sustain America’s Army in peace and war.  Among them are personnel accounting and strength reporting, casualty management, replacement operations, postal operations, morale, welfare, and recreational support, and a full range of personnel services essential to Soldier morale and the Commander’s ability to effectively plan and conduct operations.

As the Corps has evolved, the Branch has been heavily involved in force modernizations and programs designed to improve the fighting effectiveness of the Army.  As the United States mobilized for World War I, the Adjutant General’s Department pioneered the use of intelligence testing to measure the skills and aptitude of Soldiers coming into the Army.  These tests and associated interview methods became the basis of the modern military personnel system that recruits and assigns Soldiers to the various occupational skills and specialties around which the Army’s modern combined arms teams are built.  On the battlefields of Europe and the South Pacific during World War II, the Adjutant General’s Department employed the first use of computer technology to process wartime strength and casualty information.

Crafted from the lessons of modern war and the emerging personnel requirements of a global U.S. military commitment, the Army Organization Act of 1950 established the Adjutant General’s Corps as a separate branch of service.  With branch status came the obligation to prepare for war in peacetime – training Soldiers in the specialty and developing personnel doctrine and unit structure and organization integral to the support of Army operations around the world.

In executing that mission, the Adjutant General’s Corps has served as a key combat multiplier in support of combat operations in Korea, Vietnam, Grenada, and Panama.  Since the end of the Cold War, the Adjutant General’s Corps has deployed to Southwest Asia in support of Operations Desert Shield and Storm, and has participated in a number of contingency operations essential to the security and well being of our nation.  Soldiers of the Adjutant General’s Corps were among those supporting peacekeeping operations in Bosnia and Kosovo, Operation Enduring Freedom in Pakistan and Afghanistan and Operation Iraqi Freedom.  As the branch has evolved, Army leaders have come to realize that the personnel system is as vital to the war fighting capability and morale of individual Soldiers and their Families as it is to mission accomplishment.

Today, the Adjutant General’s Corps continues to develop new and increasingly efficient means of providing timely and dependable personnel support to Commanders and the entire Army family.  As we enter into a new millennium, our confidence in the future is buoyed by immense pride in our past.  We remain and will always be prepared to Defend and Serve!

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